CYRAMZA ramucirumab injection 10mg/mL solution by Eli Lilly and Company

Please click for full Prescribing Information for CYRAMZA.


Adv. or Metastatic Gastic/GEJ Adenocarcinoma
1 FILES

Physician Resources
Metastatic Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer (mNSCLC) - 2nd-line
3 FILES

Physician Resources
Patient Resources
EGFR mut+ mNSCLC - 1st-line
2 FILES

Physician Resources
Patient Resources
AFP-High (≥ 400 ng/mL) Hepatocellular Carcinoma
3 FILES

Physician Resources
Metastatic Colorectal Cancer (mCRC)
1 FILES

Physician Resources
Savings and Support
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Savings & Support
Indications & Usage

INDICATIONS AND USAGE

CYRAMZA as a single agent, or in combination with paclitaxel, is indicated for the treatment of patients with advanced or metastatic gastric or gastroesophageal junction (GEJ) adenocarcinoma with disease progression on or after prior fluoropyrimidine- or platinum-containing chemotherapy.

CYRAMZA, in combination with erlotinib, is indicated for the first-line treatment of patients with metastatic non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) whose tumors have epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) exon 19 deletions or exon 21 (L858R) substitution mutations.

CYRAMZA, in combination with docetaxel, is indicated for the treatment of patients with metastatic non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) with disease progression on or after platinum-based chemotherapy. Patients with epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) or anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK) genomic tumor aberrations should have disease progression on FDA-approved therapy for these aberrations prior to receiving CYRAMZA.

CYRAMZA, in combination with FOLFIRI (irinotecan, folinic acid, and fluorouracil), is indicated for the treatment of patients with metastatic colorectal cancer (mCRC) with disease progression on or after prior therapy with bevacizumab, oxaliplatin, and a fluoropyrimidine.

CYRAMZA, as a single agent, is indicated for the treatment of patients with hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) who have an alpha-fetoprotein (AFP) of ≥400 ng/mL and have been treated with sorafenib.

Please click for full Prescribing Information for CYRAMZA.



Dosage & Administration

DOSAGE AND ADMINISTRATION

For intravenous (IV) infusion only. Do not administer as an IV push or bolus. Continue CYRAMZA until disease progression or unacceptable toxicity. 1

Premedications for CYRAMZA 1

  • Prior to each CYRAMZA infusion, premedicate all patients with an IV histamine H1 antagonist (eg, diphenhydramine hydrochloride)
  • For patients who have experienced a grade 1 or 2 infusion reaction, also premedicate with dexamethasone (or equivalent) and acetaminophen prior to each CYRAMZA infusion
  • When given in combination, administer CYRAMZA prior to administration of paclitaxel

SELECT IMPORTANT SAFETY INFORMATION
INFUSION-RELATED REACTIONS (IRR)

  • IRR, including severe and life-threatening IRR, occurred in CYRAMZA clinical trials. Symptoms of IRR included rigors/tremors, back pain/spasms, chest pain and/or tightness, chills, flushing, dyspnea, wheezing, hypoxia, and paresthesia. In severe cases, symptoms included bronchospasm, supraventricular tachycardia, and hypotension. In 2137 patients with various cancers treated with CYRAMZA in which premedication was recommended or required, the incidence of all Grade IRR ranged from <1-9%. Grade 3-5 IRR incidence was <1%.
  • Premedicate prior to each CYRAMZA infusion. Monitor patients during the infusion for signs and symptoms of IRR in a setting with available resuscitation equipment. Reduce the infusion rate by 50% for Grade 1-2 IRR. Permanently discontinue CYRAMZA for Grade 3-4 IRR.


EGFR mut+ mNSCLC — 1st Line

An IV infusion of CYRAMZA every 2 weeks in combination with oral once-daily erlotinib 1
CYRAMZA administration1

  • Prior to each CYRAMZA infusion, premedicate all patients with an IV H1 receptor antagonist (eg, diphenhydramine hydrochloride)
  • For patients who have experienced a Grade 1 or 2 IRR, premedicate with a histamine-1 receptor antagonist, dexamethasone (or equivalent), and acetaminophen prior to each CYRAMZA infusion
  • For IV infusion only; do not administer as IV push or bolus
  • Supplied as either 100 mg/10 mL or 500 mg/50 mL (10 mg/mL) solution, single-dose vials

The recommended dosage of CYRAMZA is 10 mg/kg every 2 weeks administered by IV infusion over 60 minutes. If the first infusion is tolerated, all subsequent CYRAMZA infusions may be administered over 30 minutes. Continue CYRAMZA until disease progression or unacceptable toxicity.1
In the event of a Grade 1 or 2 infusion-related reaction (IRR), reduce infusion rate by 50%.1
Erlotinib 150 mg per day orally.1 *

*Refer to the Prescribing Information for erlotinib for additional dosing information.


See DOSE MODIFICATION information below.


Advanced or Metastatic Gastric or GEJ Cancer
A single infusion of CYRAMZA every 2 weeks, for monotherapy or in combination with paclitaxel 1

  • Recommended dose for CYRAMZA in both treatment regimens (monotherapy and in combination therapy with paclitaxel): 8 mg/kg every 2 weeks over 60 minutes
    • If the first infusion is tolerated, all subsequent CYRAMZA infusions may be administered over 30 minutes
  • When given CYRAMZA in combination, recommended dose of paclitaxel: 80 mg/m2 over 60 minutes on days 1 and 15 of 28-day cycle
    • Administer CYRAMZA prior to administration of paclitaxel (on days 1 and 15 of 28-day cycle)


Paclitaxel administration1

  • Prior to administration of each dose of paclitaxel, patients were required to have adequate hematopoietic and hepatic function. The paclitaxel dose was permanently reduced in increments of 10 mg/m2 for a maximum of two dose reductions for grade 4 hematologic toxicity or grade 3 paclitaxel-related non-hematologic toxicity
  • For toxicities related to paclitaxel, refer to the current paclitaxel Prescribing Information


See paclitaxel prescribing information for additional dosage and administration recommendations.

See DOSE MODIFICATION information below.

Metastatic Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer
A single infusion of CYRAMZA, prior to docetaxel, every 3 weeks 1

  • Recommended dose for CYRAMZA: 10mg/kg over 60 minutes* on Day 1 of a 21 day cycle
    • If the first infusion is tolerated, all subsequent CYRAMZA infusions may be administered over 30 minutes
  • Recommended dose for docetaxel: 75 mg/m2 over 60 minutes
  • See docetaxel Prescribing Information for toxicities related to docetaxel and dosage recommendations

*For intravenous (IV) infusion only. Do not administer as IV push or bolus. If the first infusion is tolerated, all subsequent CYRAMZA infusions may be administered over 30 minutes. Continue CYRAMZA until disease progression or unacceptable toxicity. In the event of a Grade 1 or 2 IRR, reduce infusion rate by 50%.

  • Prior to each CYRAMZA infusion, premedicate all patients with an IV histamine H1 antagonist (eg, diphenhydramine hydrochloride)
  • For patients who have experienced a Grade 1 or 2 IRR, also premedicate with dexamethasone (or equivalent) and acetaminophen prior to each CYRAMZA infusion
  • Administer CYRAMZA prior to administration of docetaxel
  • Due to an increased incidence of neutropenia and febrile neutropenia, 24 patients in East Asia received a starting dose (of docetaxel) of 60 mg/m2 every 3 weeks
  • See docetaxel Prescribing Information for toxicities related to docetaxel and dosage recommendations


See DOSE MODIFICATION information below.

Metastatic Colorectal Cancer
A single infusion of CYRAMZA, prior to FOLFIRI, every 2 weeks1

  • Recommended dose for CYRAMZA: 8 mg/kg on Day 1 of a 14 day cycle over 60 minutes*
  • If the first infusion is tolerated, all subsequent CYRAMZA infusions may be administered over 30 minutes.
  • Recommended dose for FOLFIRI (Day 1 of a 14 day cycle)
    • Irinotecan 180 mg/m2 IV over 90 minutes
    • Folinic acid 400 mg/m2 IV simultaneously over 120 minutes
    • Fluorouracil 400 mg/m2 IV bolus over 2-4 minutes
    • Fluorouracil 2400 mg/m2 IV by continuous infusion over 46-48 hours


*For IV infusion only. Do not administer as IV push or bolus. Continue CYRAMZA until disease progression or unacceptable toxicity.
†Irinotecan and folinic acid IV simultaneously; followed by fluorouracil 400 mg/m2 IV bolus; followed by fluorouracil 2400 mg/m2 IV by continuous infusion over 46 to 48 hours.

See prescribing information for fluorouracil, folinic acid, and irinotecan for dosing information

See DOSE MODIFICATION information below.


AFP-High (≥400 ng/mL) Hepatocellular Carcinoma
A single infusion of CYRAMZA every 2 weeks.1

  • Recommended dose for CYRAMZA: 8 mg/kg over 60 minutes
    • Do not administer as intravenous (IV) push or bolus
    • The recommended dosage of CYRAMZA is 8 mg/kg every 2 weeks administered by intravenous infusion over 60 minutes. If the first infusion is tolerated, all subsequent CYRAMZA infusions may be administered over 30 minutes.
    • Continue CYRAMZA until disease progression or unacceptable toxicity.


Dosage Modifications for CYRAMZA 1

Hemorrhage

  • Permanently discontinue CYRAMZA for Grade 3 or 4

Gastrointestinal Perforation

  • Permanently discontinue CYRAMZA for all grades

Wound Healing Complications

  • If wound healing complications classified as all grades of severity occur, withhold CYRAMZA for 28 days prior to elective surgery. Resume CYRAMZA no sooner than 2 weeks after surgery and until adequate wound healing.
  • The safety of resumption of CYRAMZA after resolution of wound healing complications has not been established.

Arterial Thromboembolic Events

  • If arterial thromboembolic events classified as all grades of severity occur: permanently discontinue CYRAMZA

Hypertension

  • Withhold CYRAMZA until controlled with medical management for severe hypertension
  • Permanently discontinue CYRAMZA for severe hypertension that cannot be controlled with antihypertensive therapy

Infusion-Related Reactions (IRR)

  • Reduce the infusion rate of CYRAMZA by 50% for grade 1 or 2 IRR
  • Permanently discontinue CYRAMZA for grade 3 or 4 IRR

Posterior Reversible Encephalopathy Syndrome (PRES)

  • If Posterior Reversible Encephalopathy Syndrome classified as all Grades of severity: permanently discontinue CYRAMZA.

Proteinuria

  • First occurrence of increased urine protein levels greater than or equal to 2 g per 24 hours:
    • Withhold CYRAMZA until urine protein level is less than 2 g per 24 hours
    • Resume CYRAMZA at a reduced dose:
      • Reduce 8 mg dose to 6 mg
      • Reduce 10 mg dose to 8 mg
  • Reoccurrence of urine protein level greater than 2 g per 24 hours following initial dose reduction:
    • Withhold CYRAMZA until urine protein level is less than 2 g per 24 hours
    • Resume CYRAMZA at a reduced dose:
      • Reduce 6 mg dose to 5 mg
      • Reduce 8 mg dose to 6 mg
    • Urine protein level greater than 3 g per 24 hours or in the setting of nephrotic syndrome:
      • Permanently discontinue CYRAMZA


National Cancer Institute Common Toxicity Criteria for Adverse Events (NCI CTCAE) Criteria Version 4.0 used to identify adverse reactions.

INDICATIONS

CYRAMZA as a single agent, or in combination with paclitaxel, is indicated for the treatment of patients with advanced or metastatic gastric or gastroesophageal junction (GEJ) adenocarcinoma with disease progression on or after prior fluoropyrimidine- or platinum-containing chemotherapy.

CYRAMZA, in combination with erlotinib, is indicated for the first-line treatment of patients with metastatic non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) whose tumors have epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) exon 19 deletions or exon 21 (L858R) substitution mutations.

CYRAMZA, in combination with docetaxel, is indicated for the treatment of patients with metastatic non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) with disease progression on or after platinum-based chemotherapy. Patients with epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) or anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK) genomic tumor aberrations should have disease progression on FDA-approved therapy for these aberrations prior to receiving CYRAMZA.

CYRAMZA, in combination with FOLFIRI (irinotecan, folinic acid, and fluorouracil), is indicated for the treatment of patients with metastatic colorectal cancer (mCRC) with disease progression on or after prior therapy with bevacizumab, oxaliplatin, and a fluoropyrimidine.

CYRAMZA, as a single agent, is indicated for the treatment of patients with hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) who have an alpha-fetoprotein (AFP) of ≥400 ng/mL and have been treated with sorafenib.

SELECT IMPORTANT SAFETY INFORMATION
Infusion-Related Reactions (IRR)

    • IRR, including severe and life-threatening IRR, occurred in CYRAMZA clinical trials. Symptoms of IRR included rigors/tremors, back pain/spasms, chest pain and/or tightness, chills, flushing, dyspnea, wheezing, hypoxia, and paresthesia. In severe cases, symptoms included bronchospasm, supraventricular tachycardia, and hypotension. In 2137 patients with various cancers treated with CYRAMZA in which premedication was recommended or required, the incidence of all Grade IRR ranged from <1-9%. Grade 3-5 IRR incidence was <1%.
    • Premedicate prior to each CYRAMZA infusion. Monitor patients during the infusion for signs and symptoms of IRR in a setting with available resuscitation equipment. Reduce the infusion rate by 50% for Grade 1-2 IRR. Permanently discontinue CYRAMZA for Grade 3-4 IRR


Reference 1. CYRAMZA (ramucirumab) [package insert]. Indianapolis, IN: Eli Lilly and Company; 2020.

Please click for full Prescribing Information for CYRAMZA.

Dosage Forms and Strengths

DOSAGE FORMS AND STRENGTHS


  • 100 mg/10 mL (10 mg per mL) solution, single-dose vial
  • 500 mg/50 mL (10 mg per mL) solution, single-dose vial



Please click for full Prescribing Information for CYRAMZA.

Warnings & Precautions

WARNINGS AND PRECAUTIONS

Hemorrhage

  • CYRAMZA increased the risk of hemorrhage and gastrointestinal hemorrhage, including Grade ≥3 hemorrhagic events. In 2137 patients with various cancers treated with CYRAMZA, the incidence of all Grade hemorrhage ranged from 13-55%. Grade 3-5 hemorrhage incidence ranged from 2-5%.
  • Patients with gastric cancer receiving nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) were excluded from enrollment in REGARD and RAINBOW; therefore, the risk of gastric hemorrhage in CYRAMZA-treated patients with gastric tumors receiving NSAIDs is unknown.
  • Patients with NSCLC receiving therapeutic anticoagulation or with evidence of major airway invasion by cancer were excluded from REVEL. In addition, patients with NSCLC with a recent history of gross hemoptysis, those receiving chronic therapy with NSAIDs or other anti-platelet therapy other than once daily aspirin or with radiographic evidence of major blood vessel invasion or intratumor cavitation were excluded from REVEL and RELAY; therefore the risk of pulmonary hemorrhage in these groups of patients is unknown.
  • Permanently discontinue CYRAMZA in patients who experience severe (Grade 3 or 4) bleeding.


Gastrointestinal Perforations

  • CYRAMZA can increase the risk of gastrointestinal perforation, a potentially fatal event. In 2137 patients with various cancers treated with CYRAMZA, the incidence of all Grade and Grade 3-5 gastrointestinal perforations ranged from <1-2%.
  • Permanently discontinue CYRAMZA in patients who experience a gastrointestinal perforation.


Impaired Wound Healing

  • CYRAMZA has the potential to adversely affect wound healing. CYRAMZA has not been studied in patients with serious or non-healing wounds.
  • Withhold CYRAMZA for 28 days prior to elective surgery. Do not administer CYRAMZA for at least 2 weeks following a major surgical procedure and until adequate wound healing. The safety of resumption of CYRAMZA after resolution of wound healing complications has not been established.


Arterial Thromboembolic Events (ATEs)

  • Serious, sometimes fatal, ATEs, including myocardial infarction, cardiac arrest, cerebrovascular accident, and cerebral ischemia, occurred across clinical trials. In 2137 patients with various cancers treated with CYRAMZA, the incidence of all Grade ATE was 1-3%. Grade 3-5 ATE incidence was <1-2%.
  • Permanently discontinue CYRAMZA in patients who experience an ATE.


Hypertension

  • An increased incidence of severe hypertension occurred in patients receiving CYRAMZA. Across five clinical studies, excluding RELAY, in 1916 patients with various cancers treated with CYRAMZA, the incidence of all Grade hypertension ranged from 11-26%. Grade 3-5 hypertension incidence ranged from 6-15%. In 221 patients with NSCLC receiving CYRAMZA in combination with erlotinib in the RELAY study, the incidence of new or worsening hypertension was higher (45%), as was the incidence of Grade 3-5 hypertension (24%). Of the patients experiencing new or worsening hypertension in RELAY (N=100 CYRAMZA and erlotinib; N=27 placebo and erlotinib), 13% of those treated with CYRAMZA and erlotinib required initiation of 3 or more antihypertensive medications compared to 4% of patients treated with placebo and erlotinib.
  • Control hypertension prior to initiating treatment with CYRAMZA. Monitor blood pressure every two weeks or more frequently as indicated during treatment. Withhold CYRAMZA for severe hypertension until medically controlled. Permanently discontinue CYRAMZA for medically significant hypertension that cannot be controlled with antihypertensive therapy or in patients with hypertensive crisis or hypertensive encephalopathy.


Infusion-Related Reactions (IRR)

  • IRR, including severe and life-threatening IRR, occurred in CYRAMZA clinical trials. Symptoms of IRR included rigors/tremors, back pain/spasms, chest pain and/or tightness, chills, flushing, dyspnea, wheezing, hypoxia, and paresthesia. In severe cases, symptoms included bronchospasm, supraventricular tachycardia, and hypotension. In 2137 patients with various cancers treated with CYRAMZA in which premedication was recommended or required, the incidence of all Grade IRR ranged from <1- 9%. Grade 3-5 IRR incidence was <1%.
  • Premedicate prior to each CYRAMZA infusion. Monitor patients during the infusion for signs and symptoms of IRR in a setting with available resuscitation equipment. Reduce the infusion rate by 50% for Grade 1-2 IRR. Permanently discontinue CYRAMZA for Grade 3- 4 IRR.


Worsening of Pre-existing Hepatic Impairment

  • Clinical deterioration, manifested by new onset or worsening encephalopathy, ascites, or hepatorenal syndrome, was reported in patients with Child-Pugh B or C cirrhosis who received single agent CYRAMZA. Use CYRAMZA in patients with Child-Pugh B or C cirrhosis only if the potential benefits of treatment are judged to outweigh the risks of clinical deterioration.
  • Based on safety data from REACH-2, in patients with Child-Pugh A liver cirrhosis, the pooled incidence of hepatic encephalopathy and hepatorenal syndrome was higher for patients who received CYRAMZA (6%) compared to patients who received placebo (0%).


Posterior Reversible Encephalopathy Syndrome (PRES)

  • PRES (also known as Reversible Posterior Leukoencephalopathy Syndrome [RPLS]) has been reported in <0.1% of 2137 patients with various cancers treated with CYRAMZA. Symptoms of PRES include seizure, headache, nausea/vomiting, blindness, or altered consciousness, with or without associated hypertension.
  • Permanently discontinue CYRAMZA in patients who develop PRES. Symptoms may resolve or improve within days, although some patients with PRES can experience ongoing neurologic sequelae or death.


Proteinuria Including Nephrotic Syndrome

  • In 2137 patients with various cancers treated with CYRAMZA, the incidence of all Grade proteinuria ranged from 3-34%. Grade ≥3 proteinuria (including 4 patients with nephrotic syndrome) incidence ranged from <1-3%.
  • Monitor for proteinuria. Withhold CYRAMZA for urine protein levels that are 2 or more grams over 24 hours. Reinitiate CYRAMZA at a reduced dose once the urine protein level returns to less than 2 grams over 24 hours. Permanently discontinue CYRAMZA for urine protein levels greater than 3 grams over 24 hours or in the setting of nephrotic syndrome.


Thyroid Dysfunction

  • In 2137 patients with various cancers treated with CYRAMZA, the incidence of Grade 1-2 hypothyroidism ranged from <1-3%; there were no reports of Grade 3-5 hypothyroidism. Monitor thyroid function during treatment with CYRAMZA.


Embryo-Fetal Toxicity

  • CYRAMZA can cause fetal harm when administered to pregnant women. Advise pregnant women of the potential risk to a fetus. Advise females of reproductive potential to use effective contraception during treatment with CYRAMZA and for 3 months after the last dose.



Please click for full Prescribing Information for CYRAMZA.

Adverse Reactions

ADVERSE REACTIONS

REGARD:

  • The most common adverse reactions (all Grades) observed in single agent CYRAMZA-treated gastric cancer patients at a rate of ≥5% and ≥2% higher than placebo were hypertension (16% vs 8%), diarrhea (14% vs 9%), headache (9% vs 3%), and hyponatremia (6% vs 2%).
  • The most common serious adverse reactions with CYRAMZA were anemia (3.8%) and intestinal obstruction (2.1%). Red blood cell transfusions were given to 11% of CYRAMZA-treated patients vs 8.7% of patients who received placebo.
  • Clinically relevant adverse reactions reported in ≥1% and <5% of CYRAMZA-treated patients in REGARD were: neutropenia (4.7%), epistaxis (4.7%), rash (4.2%), intestinal obstruction (2.1%), and arterial thromboembolic events (1.7%).
  • Across clinical trials of CYRAMZA administered as a single agent, clinically relevant adverse reactions (including Grade ≥3) reported in CYRAMZA-treated patients included proteinuria, gastrointestinal perforation, and IRR. In REGARD, according to laboratory assessment, 8% of CYRAMZA-treated patients developed proteinuria vs 3% of placebo-treated patients. Two patients discontinued CYRAMZA due to proteinuria. The rate of gastrointestinal perforation in REGARD was 0.8% and the rate of IRR was 0.4%.


RAINBOW:

  • The most common adverse reactions (all Grades) observed in patients treated with CYRAMZA with paclitaxel at a rate of ≥5% and ≥2% higher than placebo with paclitaxel were fatigue/asthenia (57% vs 44%), neutropenia (54% vs 31%), diarrhea (32% vs 23%), epistaxis (31% vs 7%), hypertension (25% vs 6%), peripheral edema (25% vs 14%), stomatitis (20% vs 7%), proteinuria (17% vs 6%), thrombocytopenia (13% vs 6%), hypoalbuminemia (11% vs 5%), and gastrointestinal hemorrhage events (10% vs 6%).
  • The most common serious adverse reactions with CYRAMZA with paclitaxel were neutropenia (3.7%) and febrile neutropenia (2.4%); 19% of patients who received CYRAMZA with paclitaxel received granulocyte colony-stimulating factors.
  • Adverse reactions resulting in discontinuation of any component of the CYRAMZA with paclitaxel combination in ≥2% of patients in RAINBOW were neutropenia (4%) and thrombocytopenia (3%).
  • Clinically relevant adverse reactions reported in ≥1% and <5% of patients receiving CYRAMZA with paclitaxel were sepsis (3.1%), including 5 fatal events, and gastrointestinal perforations (1.2%), including 1 fatal event.


REVEL:

  • The most common adverse reactions (all Grades) observed in patients treated with CYRAMZA with docetaxel at a rate of ≥5% and ≥2% higher than placebo with docetaxel were neutropenia (55% vs 46%), fatigue/asthenia (55% vs 50%), stomatitis/mucosal inflammation (37% vs 19%), epistaxis (19% vs 7%), febrile neutropenia (16% vs 10%), peripheral edema (16% vs 9%), thrombocytopenia (13% vs 5%), lacrimation increased (13% vs 5%), and hypertension (11% vs 5%).
  • The most common serious adverse reactions with CYRAMZA with docetaxel were febrile neutropenia (14%), pneumonia (6%), and neutropenia (5%). The use of granulocyte colony-stimulating factors was 42% in CYRAMZA with docetaxel- treated patients versus 37% in patients who received placebo with docetaxel.
  • Treatment discontinuation due to adverse reactions occurred more frequently in CYRAMZA with docetaxel-treated patients (9%) than in placebo with docetaxel-treated patients (5%). The most common adverse reactions leading to treatment discontinuation of CYRAMZA were IRR (0.5%) and epistaxis (0.3%).
  • For patients with non-squamous histology, the overall incidence of pulmonary hemorrhage was 7% and the incidence of Grade ≥3 pulmonary hemorrhage was 1% for CYRAMZA with docetaxel compared to 6% overall incidence and 1% for Grade ≥3 pulmonary hemorrhage for placebo with docetaxel. For patients with squamous histology, the overall incidence of pulmonary hemorrhage was 10% and the incidence of Grade ≥3 pulmonary hemorrhage was 2% for CYRAMZA with docetaxel compared to 12% overall incidence and 2% for Grade ≥3 pulmonary hemorrhage for placebo with docetaxel.
  • Clinically relevant adverse reactions reported in ≥1% and <5% of CYRAMZA with docetaxel-treated patients in REVEL were hyponatremia (4.8%) and proteinuria (3.3%).


RELAY:

  • The most common adverse reactions (all Grades) observed in patients treated with CYRAMZA with erlotinib at a rate of ≥5% and ≥2% higher than placebo with erlotinib were infections (81% vs 76%), diarrhea (70% vs 71%), hypertension (45% vs 12%), stomatitis (42% vs 36%), alopecia (34% vs 20%), epistaxis (34% vs 12%), proteinuria (34% vs 8%), peripheral edema (23% vs 4%), headache (15% vs 7%), gastrointestinal hemorrhage (10% vs 3%), gingival bleeding (9% vs 1%), and pulmonary hemorrhage (7% vs 2%).
  • The most common serious adverse reactions with CYRAMZA with erlotinib were pneumonia (3.2%), cellulitis (1.8%), and pneumothorax (1.8%). Red blood cell transfusions were given to 3.2% of CYRAMZA-treated patients versus 0 patients who received placebo.
  • Treatment discontinuation of all study drugs due to adverse reactions occurred in 13% of CYRAMZA with erlotinib-treated patients, with increased alanine aminotransferase (1.4%) and paronychia (1.4%) being the most common. The most common adverse reactions leading to treatment discontinuation of CYRAMZA were proteinuria (8.6%) and hyperbilirubinemia (6%).
  • Of the 221 patients who received CYRAMZA with erlotinib, 119 (54%) were 65 and over, while 29 (13%) were 75 and over. Adverse reactions occurring at a 10% or higher incidence in patients receiving CYRAMZA with erlotinib and with a 10% or greater difference between patients aged 65 or older compared to patients aged less than 65 years were: diarrhea (75% versus 65%), hypertension (50% versus 40%), increased ALT (49% versus 35%), increased AST (49% versus 33%), stomatitis (46% versus 36%), decreased appetite (32% versus 19%), dysgeusia (23% versus 12%), and weight loss (19% versus 6%).


RAISE:

  • The most common adverse reactions (all Grades) observed in patients treated with CYRAMZA with FOLFIRI at a rate of ≥5% and ≥2% higher than placebo with FOLFIRI were diarrhea (60% vs 51%), neutropenia (59% vs 46%), decreased appetite (37% vs 27%), epistaxis (33% vs 15%), stomatitis (31% vs 21%), thrombocytopenia (28% vs 14%), hypertension (26% vs 9%), peripheral edema (20% vs 9%), proteinuria (17% vs 5%), palmar-plantar erythrodysesthesia syndrome (13% vs 5%), gastrointestinal hemorrhage events (12% vs 7%), and hypoalbuminemia (6% vs 2%). Twenty percent of patients treated with CYRAMZA with FOLFIRI received granulocyte colony-stimulating factors.
  • The most common serious adverse reactions with CYRAMZA with FOLFIRI were diarrhea (3.6%), intestinal obstruction (3.0%), and febrile neutropenia (2.8%).
  • Treatment discontinuation of any study drug due to adverse reactions occurred more frequently in CYRAMZA with FOLFIRI-treated patients (29%) than in placebo with FOLFIRI-treated patients (13%). The most common adverse reactions leading to discontinuation of any component of CYRAMZA with FOLFIRI as compared to placebo with FOLFIRI were neutropenia (12.5% vs 5.3%) and thrombocytopenia (4.2% vs 0.8%). The most common adverse reactions leading to treatment discontinuation of CYRAMZA were proteinuria (1.5%), and gastrointestinal perforation (1.7%).
  • Clinically relevant adverse reaction reported in ≥1% and <5% of patients receiving CYRAMZA with FOLFIRI was gastrointestinal perforation (1.7%), including 4 fatal events.
  • Thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH) levels were evaluated in 224 patients (115 CYRAMZA with FOLFIRI-treated patients and 109 placebo with FOLFIRI-treated patients) with normal baseline TSH levels. Increased TSH levels were observed in 53 (46%) patients treated with CYRAMZA with FOLFIRI compared with 4 (4%) patients treated with placebo with FOLFIRI.


REACH-2:

  • The most common adverse reactions (all Grades) observed in single agent CYRAMZA-treated HCC patients at a rate of ≥10% and ≥2% higher than placebo were fatigue (36% vs 20%), peripheral edema (25% vs 14%), hypertension (25% vs 13%), abdominal pain (25% vs 16%), decreased appetite (23% vs 20%), proteinuria (20% vs 4%), nausea (19% vs 12%), ascites (18% vs 7%), headache (14% vs 5%), epistaxis (14% vs 3%), insomnia (11% vs 6%), pyrexia (10% vs 3%), vomiting (10% vs 7%), and back pain (10% vs 7%).
  • The most common serious adverse reactions with CYRAMZA were ascites (3%) and pneumonia (3%).
  • Treatment discontinuations due to adverse reactions occurred in 18% of CYRAMZA-treated patients, with proteinuria being the most frequent (2%).
  • Clinically relevant adverse reactions reported in ≥1% and <10% of CYRAMZA-treated patients in REACH-2 were IRR (9%), hepatic encephalopathy (5%) including 1 fatal event, and hepatorenal syndrome (2%) including 1 fatal event.



Please click for full Prescribing Information for CYRAMZA.

Use in Specific Populations

USE IN SPECIFIC POPULATIONS

Pregnancy

Risk Summary

Based on its mechanism of action, CYRAMZA can cause fetal harm when administered to a pregnant woman. There are no available data on CYRAMZA use in pregnant women. Animal models link angiogenesis, VEGF and VEGFR2 to critical aspects of female reproduction, embryo-fetal development, and postnatal development. No animal studies have been conducted to evaluate the effect of ramucirumab on reproduction and fetal development. Advise a pregnant woman of the potential risk to a fetus.

In the U.S. general population, the estimated background risk of major birth defects and miscarriage in clinically recognized pregnancies is 2-4% and 15-20%, respectively.

Data

Animal Data

No animal studies have been specifically conducted to evaluate the effect of ramucirumab on reproduction and fetal development. In mice, loss of the VEGFR2 gene resulted in embryo-fetal death and these fetuses lacked organized blood vessels and blood islands in the yolk sac. In other models, VEGFR2 signaling was associated with development and maintenance of endometrial and placental vascular function, successful blastocyst implantation, maternal and feto-placental vascular differentiation, and development during early pregnancy in rodents and non-human primates. Disruption of VEGF signaling has also been associated with developmental anomalies including poor development of the cranial region, forelimbs, forebrain, heart, and blood vessels.

Lactation

Risk Summary

There is no information on the presence of ramucirumab in human milk or its effects on the breastfed child or on milk production. Human IgG is present in human milk, but published data suggest that breast milk antibodies do not enter the neonatal and infant circulation in substantial amounts. Because of the potential risk for serious adverse reactions in breastfed children from ramucirumab, advise women not to breastfeed during treatment with CYRAMZA and for 2 months after the last dose.

Females and Males of Reproductive Potential

Pregnancy Testing

Verify the pregnancy status of females of reproductive potential prior to initiating CYRAMZA.

Contraception

Based on its mechanism of action, CYRAMZA can cause fetal harm when administered to a pregnant woman.

Females

Advise females of reproductive potential to use effective contraception during treatment with CYRAMZA and for 3 months after the last dose.

Infertility

Females

Advise females of reproductive potential that based on animal data CYRAMZA may impair fertility.

Pediatric Use

The safety and effectiveness of CYRAMZA in pediatric patients have not been established.

Juvenile Animal Toxicity Data

In animal studies, effects on epiphyseal growth plates were identified. In cynomolgus monkeys, anatomical pathology revealed adverse effects on the epiphyseal growth plate (thickening and osteochondropathy) at all doses tested (5-50 mg/kg). Ramucirumab exposure at the lowest weekly dose tested in the cynomolgus monkey was 0.2 times the exposure in humans at the recommended dose of ramucirumab as a single agent.

Geriatric Use

Of the 563 CYRAMZA-treated patients in REGARD and RAINBOW, 205 (36%) were 65 and over, while 41 (7%) were 75 and over. No overall differences in safety or effectiveness were observed between these subjects and younger subjects.

Of the 221 patients who received CYZAMZA with erlotinib, 119 (54%) were 65 and over, while 29 (13%) were 75 and over. Adverse reactions occurring at a 10% or higher incidence in patients receiving CYRAMZA with erlotinib and with a 10% or greater difference between patients aged 65 or older compared to patients aged less than 65 years were: diarrhea (75% versus 65%), hypertension (50% versus 40%), increased ALT (49% versus 35%), increased AST (49% versus 33%), stomatitis (46% versus 36%), decreased appetite (32% versus 19%), dysgeusia (23% versus 12%), and weight loss (19% versus 6%).

Of the 1253 patients in REVEL, 455 (36%) were 65 and over and 84 (7%) were 75 and over. Of the 627 patients who received CYRAMZA with docetaxel in REVEL, 237 (38%) were 65 and over, while 45 (7%) were 75 and over. In an exploratory subgroup analysis of REVEL, the hazard ratio for overall survival in patients less than 65 years old was 0.74 (95% CI: 0.62, 0.87) and in patients 65 years and over was 1.10 (95% CI: 0.89, 1.36).

Of the 529 patients who received CYRAMZA with FOLFIRI in RAISE, 209 (40%) were 65 and over, while 51 (10%) were 75 and over. Overall, no differences in safety or effectiveness were observed between these subjects and younger subjects.

Of the 197 patients who received CYRAMZA in REACH-2, 95 (48%) were 65 years and over, while 37 (19%) were 75 years and over. Overall, no differences in efficacy were observed between these subjects and younger subjects.

Hepatic Impairment

No dose adjustment is recommended for patients with mild (total bilirubin within ULN and aspartate aminotransferase [AST] >ULN or total bilirubin >1 to 1.5 times ULN and any AST) or moderate (total bilirubin >1.5 to 3 times ULN and any AST) hepatic impairment. Clinical deterioration was reported in patients with Child-Pugh B or C cirrhosis who received single agent CYRAMZA.

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ICD Codes

RELATED ICD CODES:

Carcinoma In Situ of Stomach [230.2]
Disseminated Malignant Neoplasm [199.0]
Malignant Carcinoid Tumor of the Stomach [209.23]
Malignant Neoplasm Not Otherwise Specified [199]
Malignant Neoplasm of Anal Canal [154.2]
Malignant Neoplasm of Anus Not Otherwise Specified [154.3]
Malignant Neoplasm of Appendix [153.5]
Malignant Neoplasm of Ascending Colon [153.6]
Malignant Neoplasm of Bronchus or Lung Not Elsewhere Classified [162.8]
Malignant Neoplasm of Bronchus or Lung Not Otherwise Specified [162.9]
Malignant Neoplasm of Cecum [153.4]
Malignant Neoplasm of Colon [153]
Malignant Neoplasm of Colon Not Elsewhere Classified [153.8]
Malignant Neoplasm of Colon Not Otherwise Specified [153.9]
Malignant Neoplasm of Descending Colon [153.2]
Malignant Neoplasm of Hepatic Flexure [153.0]
Malignant Neoplasm of Ill-Defined Sites of Gastrointestinal Tract [159.9]
Malignant Neoplasm of Pyloric Antrum [151.2]
Malignant Neoplasm of Pylorus [151.1]
Malignant Neoplasm of Rectosigmoid Junction [154.0]
Malignant Neoplasm of Rectum [154.1]
Malignant Neoplasm of Rectum and Anus [154]
Malignant Neoplasm of Rectum and Anus Not Elsewhere Classified [154.8]
Malignant Neoplasm of Sigmoid Colon [153.3]
Malignant Neoplasm of Splenic Flexure [153.7]
Malignant Neoplasm of Stomach [151]
Malignant Neoplasm of Stomach Body [151.4]
Malignant Neoplasm of Stomach Cardia [151.0]
Malignant Neoplasm of Stomach Fundus [151.3]
Malignant Neoplasm of Stomach Greater Curvature [151.6]
Malignant Neoplasm of Stomach Lesser Curvature [151.5]
Malignant Neoplasm of Stomach Not Elsewhere Classified [151.8]
Malignant Neoplasm of Stomach Not Otherwise Specified [151.9]
Malignant Neoplasm of Trachea, Bronchus and Lung [162]
Malignant Neoplasm of Transverse Colon [153.1]
Neoplasm of Uncertain Behavior of Trachea, Bronchus and Lung [235.7]
Neoplasms of Unspecified Nature [239]
Neoplasms of Unspecified Nature of Other Specified Sites [239.89]
Other Malignant Neoplasm [199.1]
Other Malignant Neoplasm of Sites of Gastrointestinal Tract or Peritoneum [159]
Personal History of Malignant Neoplasm [V10]



CYRAMZA® is a registered trademark owned or licensed by Eli Lilly and Company, its subsidiaries, or affiliates.

PP-RB-US-3271  11/2020 © Lilly USA, LLC 2020. All rights reserved.


Please click for full Prescribing Information for CYRAMZA.



INDICATIONS AND IMPORTANT SAFETY INFORMATION

INDICATIONS

CYRAMZA as a single agent, or in combination with paclitaxel, is indicated for the treatment of patients with advanced or metastatic gastric or gastroesophageal junction (GEJ) adenocarcinoma with disease progression on or after prior fluoropyrimidine- or platinum-containing chemotherapy.


CYRAMZA, in combination with erlotinib, is indicated for the first-line treatment of patients with metastatic non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) whose tumors have epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) exon 19 deletions or exon 21 (L858R) substitution mutations.

CYRAMZA, in combination with docetaxel, is indicated for the treatment of patients with metastatic non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) with disease progression on or after platinum-based chemotherapy. Patients with epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) or anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK) genomic tumor aberrations should have disease progression on FDA-approved therapy for these aberrations prior to receiving CYRAMZA.

CYRAMZA, in combination with FOLFIRI (irinotecan, folinic acid, and fluorouracil), is indicated for the treatment of patients with metastatic colorectal cancer (mCRC) with disease progression on or after prior therapy with bevacizumab, oxaliplatin, and a fluoropyrimidine.

CYRAMZA, as a single agent, is indicated for the treatment of patients with hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) who have an alpha-fetoprotein (AFP) of ≥400 ng/mL and have been treated with sorafenib.


IMPORTANT SAFETY INFORMATION FOR CYRAMZA® (ramucirumab)

Warnings and Precautions

Hemorrhage

·         CYRAMZA increased the risk of hemorrhage and gastrointestinal hemorrhage, including Grade ≥3 hemorrhagic events. In 2137 patients with various cancers treated with CYRAMZA, the incidence of all Grade hemorrhage ranged from 13-55%. Grade 3-5 hemorrhage incidence ranged from 2-5%.

·         Patients with gastric cancer receiving nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) were excluded from enrollment in REGARD and RAINBOW; therefore, the risk of gastric hemorrhage in CYRAMZA-treated patients with gastric tumors receiving NSAIDs is unknown.

·         Patients with NSCLC receiving therapeutic anticoagulation or with evidence of major airway invasion by cancer were excluded from REVEL. In addition, patients with NSCLC with a recent history of gross hemoptysis, those receiving chronic therapy with NSAIDs or other anti-platelet therapy other than once daily aspirin or with radiographic evidence of major blood vessel invasion or intratumor cavitation were excluded from REVEL and RELAY; therefore the risk of pulmonary hemorrhage in these groups of patients is unknown.

·         Permanently discontinue CYRAMZA in patients who experience severe (Grade 3 or 4) bleeding.

Gastrointestinal Perforations

  • CYRAMZA can increase the risk of gastrointestinal perforation, a potentially fatal event. In 2137 patients with various cancers treated with CYRAMZA, the incidence of all Grade and Grade 3-5 gastrointestinal perforations ranged from <1-2%.
  • Permanently discontinue CYRAMZA in patients who experience a gastrointestinal perforation.

Impaired Wound Healing

  • CYRAMZA has the potential to adversely affect wound healing. CYRAMZA has not been studied in patients with serious or non-healing wounds.
  • Withhold CYRAMZA for 28 days prior to elective surgery. Do not administer CYRAMZA for at least 2 weeks following a major surgical procedure and until adequate wound healing. The safety of resumption of CYRAMZA after resolution of wound healing complications has not been established.

Arterial Thromboembolic Events (ATEs)

  • Serious, sometimes fatal, ATEs, including myocardial infarction, cardiac arrest, cerebrovascular accident, and cerebral ischemia, occurred across clinical trials. In 2137 patients with various cancers treated with CYRAMZA, the incidence of all Grade ATE was 1-3%. Grade 3-5 ATE incidence was <1-2%.
  • Permanently discontinue CYRAMZA in patients who experience an ATE.

Hypertension

  • An increased incidence of severe hypertension occurred in patients receiving CYRAMZA.  Across five clinical studies, excluding RELAY, in 1916 patients with various cancers treated with CYRAMZA, the incidence of all Grade hypertension ranged from 11-26%. Grade 3-5 hypertension incidence ranged from 6-15%.  In 221 patients with NSCLC receiving CYRAMZA in combination with erlotinib in the RELAY study, the incidence of new or worsening hypertension was higher (45%), as was the incidence of Grade 3-5 hypertension (24%).  Of the patients experiencing new or worsening hypertension in RELAY (N=100 CYRAMZA and erlotinib; N=27 placebo and erlotinib), 13% of those treated with CYRAMZA and erlotinib required initiation of 3 or more antihypertensive medications compared to 4% of patients treated with placebo and erlotinib. 
  • Control hypertension prior to initiating treatment with CYRAMZA. Monitor blood pressure every two weeks or more frequently as indicated during treatment. Withhold CYRAMZA for severe hypertension until medically controlled. Permanently discontinue CYRAMZA for medically significant hypertension that cannot be controlled with antihypertensive therapy or in patients with hypertensive crisis or hypertensive encephalopathy.

Infusion-Related Reactions (IRR)

  • IRR, including severe and life-threatening IRR, occurred in CYRAMZA clinical trials. Symptoms of IRR included rigors/tremors, back pain/spasms, chest pain and/or tightness, chills, flushing, dyspnea, wheezing, hypoxia, and paresthesia. In severe cases, symptoms included bronchospasm, supraventricular tachycardia, and hypotension.  In 2137 patients with various cancers treated with CYRAMZA in which premedication was recommended or required, the incidence of all Grade IRR ranged from <1- 9%. Grade 3-5 IRR incidence was <1%.
  • Premedicate prior to each CYRAMZA infusion. Monitor patients during the infusion for signs and symptoms of IRR in a setting with available resuscitation equipment. Reduce the infusion rate by 50% for Grade 1-2 IRR. Permanently discontinue CYRAMZA for Grade 3- 4 IRR.

Worsening of Pre-existing Hepatic Impairment

  • Clinical deterioration, manifested by new onset or worsening encephalopathy, ascites, or hepatorenal syndrome, was reported in patients with Child-Pugh B or C cirrhosis who received single agent CYRAMZA. Use CYRAMZA in patients with Child-Pugh B or C cirrhosis only if the potential benefits of treatment are judged to outweigh the risks of clinical deterioration.
  • Based on safety data from REACH-2, in patients with Child-Pugh A liver cirrhosis, the pooled incidence of hepatic encephalopathy and hepatorenal syndrome was higher for patients who received CYRAMZA (6%) compared to patients who received placebo (0%).

Posterior Reversible Encephalopathy Syndrome (PRES)

  • PRES (also known as Reversible Posterior Leukoencephalopathy Syndrome [RPLS]) has been reported in <0.1% of 2137 patients with various cancers treated with CYRAMZA. Symptoms of PRES include seizure, headache, nausea/vomiting, blindness, or altered consciousness, with or without associated hypertension.
  • Permanently discontinue CYRAMZA in patients who develop PRES. Symptoms may resolve or improve within days, although some patients with PRES can experience ongoing neurologic sequelae or death.

Proteinuria Including Nephrotic Syndrome

  • In 2137 patients with various cancers treated with CYRAMZA, the incidence of all Grade proteinuria ranged from 3-34%. Grade ≥3 proteinuria (including 4 patients with nephrotic syndrome) incidence ranged from <1-3%.
  • Monitor for proteinuria. Withhold CYRAMZA for urine protein levels that are 2 or more grams over 24 hours. Reinitiate CYRAMZA at a reduced dose once the urine protein level returns to less than 2 grams over 24 hours. Permanently discontinue CYRAMZA for urine protein levels greater than 3 grams over 24 hours or in the setting of nephrotic syndrome.

Thyroid Dysfunction

  • In 2137 patients with various cancers treated with CYRAMZA, the incidence of Grade 1-2 hypothyroidism ranged from <1-3%; there were no reports of Grade 3-5 hypothyroidism. Monitor thyroid function during treatment with CYRAMZA.

Embryo-Fetal Toxicity

  • CYRAMZA can cause fetal harm when administered to pregnant women. Advise pregnant women of the potential risk to a fetus. Advise females of reproductive potential to use effective contraception during treatment with CYRAMZA and for 3 months after the last dose.

Lactation

  • Because of the potential risk for serious adverse reactions in breastfed children from ramucirumab, advise women not to breastfeed during treatment with CYRAMZA and for 2 months after the last dose.

Adverse Reactions

REGARD:

  • The most common adverse reactions (all Grades) observed in single agent CYRAMZA-treated gastric cancer patients at a rate of ≥5% and ≥2% higher than placebo were hypertension (16% vs 8%), diarrhea (14% vs 9%), headache (9% vs 3%), and hyponatremia (6% vs 2%).
  • The most common serious adverse reactions with CYRAMZA were anemia (3.8%) and intestinal obstruction (2.1%). Red blood cell transfusions were given to 11% of CYRAMZA-treated patients vs 8.7% of patients who received placebo.
  • Clinically relevant adverse reactions reported in ≥1% and <5% of CYRAMZA-treated patients in REGARD were: neutropenia (4.7%), epistaxis (4.7%), rash (4.2%), intestinal obstruction (2.1%), and arterial thromboembolic events (1.7%).
  • Across clinical trials of CYRAMZA administered as a single agent, clinically relevant adverse reactions (including Grade ≥3) reported in CYRAMZA-treated patients included proteinuria, gastrointestinal perforation, and IRR. In REGARD, according to laboratory assessment, 8% of CYRAMZA-treated patients developed proteinuria vs 3% of placebo-treated patients. Two patients discontinued CYRAMZA due to proteinuria. The rate of gastrointestinal perforation in REGARD was 0.8% and the rate of IRR was 0.4%.

RAINBOW:

  • The most common adverse reactions (all Grades) observed in patients treated with CYRAMZA with paclitaxel at a rate of ≥5% and ≥2% higher than placebo with paclitaxel were fatigue/asthenia (57% vs 44%), neutropenia (54% vs 31%), diarrhea (32% vs 23%), epistaxis (31% vs 7%), hypertension (25% vs 6%), peripheral edema (25% vs 14%), stomatitis (20% vs 7%), proteinuria (17% vs 6%), thrombocytopenia (13% vs 6%), hypoalbuminemia (11% vs 5%), and gastrointestinal hemorrhage events (10% vs 6%).
  • The most common serious adverse reactions with CYRAMZA with paclitaxel were neutropenia (3.7%) and febrile neutropenia (2.4%); 19% of patients who received CYRAMZA with paclitaxel received granulocyte colony-stimulating factors.
  • Adverse reactions resulting in discontinuation of any component of the CYRAMZA with paclitaxel combination in ≥2% of patients in RAINBOW were neutropenia (4%) and thrombocytopenia (3%).
  • Clinically relevant adverse reactions reported in ≥1% and <5% of patients receiving CYRAMZA with paclitaxel were sepsis (3.1%), including 5 fatal events, and gastrointestinal perforations (1.2%), including 1 fatal event.

REVEL:

  • The most common adverse reactions (all Grades) observed in patients treated with CYRAMZA with docetaxel at a rate of ≥5% and ≥2% higher than placebo with docetaxel were neutropenia (55% vs 46%), fatigue/asthenia (55% vs 50%), stomatitis/mucosal inflammation (37% vs 19%), epistaxis (19% vs 7%), febrile neutropenia (16% vs 10%), peripheral edema (16% vs 9%), thrombocytopenia (13% vs 5%), lacrimation increased (13% vs 5%), and hypertension (11% vs 5%).
  • The most common serious adverse reactions with CYRAMZA with docetaxel were febrile neutropenia (14%), pneumonia (6%), and neutropenia (5%). The use of granulocyte colony-stimulating factors was 42% in CYRAMZA with docetaxel- treated patients versus 37% in patients who received placebo with docetaxel.
  • Treatment discontinuation due to adverse reactions occurred more frequently in CYRAMZA with docetaxel-treated patients (9%) than in placebo with docetaxel-treated patients (5%). The most common adverse reactions leading to treatment discontinuation of CYRAMZA were IRR (0.5%) and epistaxis (0.3%).
  • For patients with non-squamous histology, the overall incidence of pulmonary hemorrhage was 7% and the incidence of Grade ≥3 pulmonary hemorrhage was 1% for CYRAMZA with docetaxel compared to 6% overall incidence and 1% for Grade ≥3 pulmonary hemorrhage for placebo with docetaxel. For patients with squamous histology, the overall incidence of pulmonary hemorrhage was 10% and the incidence of Grade ≥3 pulmonary hemorrhage was 2% for CYRAMZA with docetaxel compared to 12% overall incidence and 2% for Grade ≥3 pulmonary hemorrhage for placebo with docetaxel.
  • Clinically relevant adverse reactions reported in ≥1% and <5% of CYRAMZA with docetaxel-treated patients in REVEL were hyponatremia (4.8%) and proteinuria (3.3%).

RELAY:

  • The most common adverse reactions (all Grades) observed in patients treated with CYRAMZA with erlotinib at a rate of ≥5% and ≥2% higher than placebo with erlotinib were infections (81% vs 76%), diarrhea (70% vs 71%), hypertension (45% vs 12%), stomatitis (42% vs 36%), alopecia (34% vs 20%), epistaxis (34% vs 12%), proteinuria (34% vs 8%), peripheral edema (23% vs 4%), headache (15% vs 7%), gastrointestinal hemorrhage (10% vs 3%), gingival bleeding (9% vs 1%), and pulmonary hemorrhage (7% vs 2%).
  • The most common serious adverse reactions with CYRAMZA with erlotinib were pneumonia (3.2%), cellulitis (1.8%), and pneumothorax (1.8%).  Red blood cell transfusions were given to 3.2% of CYRAMZA-treated patients versus 0 patients who received placebo. 
  • Treatment discontinuation of all study drugs due to adverse reactions occurred in 13% of CYRAMZA with erlotinib-treated patients, with increased alanine aminotransferase (1.4%) and paronychia (1.4%) being the most common. The most common adverse reactions leading to treatment discontinuation of CYRAMZA were proteinuria (8.6%) and hyperbilirubinemia (6%).
  • Of the 221 patients who received CYRAMZA with erlotinib, 119 (54%) were 65 and over, while 29 (13%) were 75 and over. Adverse reactions occurring at a 10% or higher incidence in patients receiving CYRAMZA with erlotinib and with a 10% or greater difference between patients aged 65 or older compared to patients aged less than 65 years were:  diarrhea (75% versus 65%), hypertension (50% versus 40%), increased ALT (49% versus 35%), increased AST (49% versus 33%), stomatitis (46% versus 36%), decreased appetite (32% versus 19%), dysgeusia (23% versus 12%), and weight loss (19% versus 6%).

 

RAISE:

  • The most common adverse reactions (all Grades) observed in patients treated with CYRAMZA with FOLFIRI at a rate of ≥5% and ≥2% higher than placebo with FOLFIRI were diarrhea (60% vs 51%), neutropenia (59% vs 46%), decreased appetite (37% vs 27%), epistaxis (33% vs 15%), stomatitis (31% vs 21%), thrombocytopenia (28% vs 14%), hypertension (26% vs 9%), peripheral edema (20% vs 9%), proteinuria (17% vs 5%), palmar-plantar erythrodysesthesia syndrome (13% vs 5%), gastrointestinal hemorrhage events (12% vs 7%), and hypoalbuminemia (6% vs 2%). Twenty percent of patients treated with CYRAMZA with FOLFIRI received granulocyte colony- stimulating factors.
  • The most common serious adverse reactions with CYRAMZA with FOLFIRI were diarrhea (3.6%), intestinal obstruction (3.0%), and febrile neutropenia (2.8%).
  • Treatment discontinuation of any study drug due to adverse reactions occurred more frequently in CYRAMZA with FOLFIRI-treated patients (29%) than in placebo with FOLFIRI-treated patients (13%). The most common adverse reactions leading to discontinuation of any component of CYRAMZA with FOLFIRI as compared to placebo with FOLFIRI were neutropenia (12.5% vs 5.3%) and thrombocytopenia (4.2% vs 0.8%). The most common adverse reactions leading to treatment discontinuation of CYRAMZA were proteinuria (1.5%), and gastrointestinal perforation (1.7%).
  • Clinically relevant adverse reaction reported in ≥1% and <5% of patients receiving CYRAMZA with FOLFIRI was gastrointestinal perforation (1.7%), including 4 fatal events.
  • Thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH) levels were evaluated in 224 patients (115 CYRAMZA with FOLFIRI-treated patients and 109 placebo with FOLFIRI-treated patients) with normal baseline TSH levels. Increased TSH levels were observed in 53 (46%) patients treated with CYRAMZA with FOLFIRI compared with 4 (4%) patients treated with placebo with FOLFIRI.

REACH-2:

  • The most common adverse reactions (all Grades) observed in single agent CYRAMZA-treated HCC patients at a rate of ≥10% and ≥2% higher than placebo were fatigue (36% vs 20%), peripheral edema (25% vs 14%), hypertension (25% vs 13%), abdominal pain (25% vs 16%), decreased appetite (23% vs 20%), proteinuria (20% vs 4%), nausea (19% vs 12%), ascites (18% vs 7%), headache (14% vs 5%), epistaxis (14% vs 3%), insomnia (11% vs 6%), pyrexia (10% vs 3%), vomiting (10% vs 7%), and back pain (10% vs 7%).
  • The most common serious adverse reactions with CYRAMZA were ascites (3%) and pneumonia (3%).
  • Treatment discontinuations due to adverse reactions occurred in 18% of CYRAMZA-treated patients, with proteinuria being the most frequent (2%).
  • Clinically relevant adverse reactions reported in ≥1% and <10% of CYRAMZA-treated patients in REACH-2 were IRR (9%), hepatic encephalopathy (5%) including 1 fatal event, and hepatorenal syndrome (2%) including 1 fatal event.


Please click for full Prescribing Information for CYRAMZA.

RB-P HCP ISI 29MAY2020